The 10p supermarket that is going down a storm with savvy shoppers

0
420

A supermarket where items are sold for as little as 10p is on an expansion drive, following spectacular demand. Niftie’s has not only opened up a second store, but is now taking orders online.

Described as a social supermarket, the business is operating in Dover, Kent. When it first opened, it found that shoppers cleared its shelves with hours of launch, even though items are nearing their best before date, or are classed as damaged items. Now, as shoppers seek to cut costs amid warnings that rising inflation with push up the price of goods, Niftie’s is going from strength to strength.

Most items in the store cost between 10p and 70p, meaning it is competing with even the budget supermarkets and pound discount stores. The store is the brainchild of 26 year old Nathanial Richards, who said he had been inspired as a result of having to use food banks himself. He said that he wanted to prevent so much perfectly edible food from ending up in the bin.

Online offering

Now the supermarket is set to be featured in a television documentary later this year, and products can be bought online, with next day delivery for £6. It means that goods nearing their best before date will be delivered quickly so they are still useable.

Just hours after the website went live, Mr Richards said he was thrilled to have already received a number of orders. He said it made perfect sense to help families who were struggling to manage while, at the same time, ensuring that supermarkets did not simply throw food away. He estimates that his scheme has already saved 100 tonnes of edible food from ending up in landfill.

The launch of Niftie’s coincides with other schemes from some of the Big Four supermarkets. Asda launched wonky veg boxes last year to sell vegetables which were edible but not aesthetically pleasing at a low cost. Now, Mr Richards is also hoping to start selling his own wonky veg boxes by working with a leading vegetable grower to take stock which does not go to the big supermarkets.

 

 

 

LEAVE A REPLY